CarDomain Network: CarDomain StreetFire.net Autoholics
 
Avatar
Posted On: 12/13/2012 3:06PM
retroman

What do you reach for when you want something to stay in place but only temporarily? Duck Tape?? Maybe, but I found some stuff can match even Duck Tape's holding properties. 3M Dual Lock is Velcro on steroids, and I've seen this stuff in action. In the Navy, we used it to secure stuff for sea. I one saw a few strips of it hold a 60lb printer to a filing cabinet in 20ft seas. Later I had to replace that exact same printer and that darned dual lock started to pick up that 300lb filing cabinet. The only thing that stopped it was that the cabinet was bolted to the deck. I've since been using the stuff around the house as it peels off clean (granted you have to pry it with a screwdriver first. This stuff is tough!!) and doesn't leave residue. I used it recently in my Fiero when I swapped out my ECU for a better, albeit larger one, from a Berretta. I didn't have enough space in the center console where the old ECU was for the brackets and screws on the new one, and aside from that I'd like to be able to pull the ECU out in and put it back in in a hurry without looking ghetto, and the Dual Lock did the trick. I'm still finding uses for it, but no doubt, it's definitely going in my track day tool kit right on top of the Duck Tape.

How about you: found any good products that aren't specifically automotive, but make themselves handy for a variety of gearhead uses?

 



Avatar
Posted On: 10/9/2012 8:34AM
retroman

There are few automotive options as old and as cherished as the front bench seat, and aside from the leaf spring, it is the last survivor of a bygone era dating back to the horse and buggy days. But unless you own a pickup or visit Amish Country, you won't be seeing a front bench seat anytime soon. The Chevy Impala is the last passenger car to feature the dating-friendly seating arrangement. I'm a young guy who has owned more than a few cars, but I can tell you, when I go to one of the last standing Drive-Ins, I still take my plain-jane 2000 Buick Century with a front bench seat. Maybe it's partly because my wife and I went on our first date in that car, but mostly it's because seeing a movie under the stars or having milkshakes rollerskated to my car isn't the same without it. (Neither is barreling into a curve, only to find myself thrown to the passenger side while trying to still maintain control of the car). Anyway, I guess I may be alone on this preference, and it appears that most car buyers these days want spotier buckets with infotainment systems and infinite cupholders in between. There's also the factor of not having to buckle three to a seat and flipping a coin to see who has to ride in the middle. Still a shame though that even fullsize cars won't offer the option anymore starting next year. As a fan of bench seats, I can only hope that GM will offer them sometime again in the future; they've only suspended production of the bench seats, rather than doing away with them entirely as they did with the recently discontinued cassette players. So it seems if the demand returns, we could start seing them again. More on the story at Detroit News.



Avatar
Posted On: 9/18/2012 8:27AM
retroman

Concepts. They are interesting vehicles that serve one purpose, to grab attention and look cool at 5mph. Usually when they live out their life on the show circuit, they are cut up and sent to the crusher. Every once in a while, though, one escapes the watchful eye of top management, as is the case with this Shelby Street Fighter Rampage concept. If this were any other Shelby, it would have been snatched up and restored right down to the factory chalk marks, and then sold at Barrett Jackson for an ungodly amount of change. Chrysler Shelbys though are the under dogs of the brand, and don't get the much deserved attention thier Ford brethren do. That's not to say no one has tried to buy it. It's just that the yard won't let it go because it doesn't have the paperwork to go with it. Still, it's worth pursuing. With Carroll gone, every Shelby from here on out may have his name on it, but it won't have his design input, and the fact that Shelby himself spent so much time with this car both designing and showing it makes it extra unique. You can find more on the story at turbododge.com

More »


Avatar
Posted On: 4/16/2012 10:05AM
retroman

Yeah, yeah, so I know that nearly everyone is jumping on the bandwagon. Remembering the sinking of the most infamous oceanliner in history is something that is once again popular thanks to the 100th anniversary of that fateful night. As a sailor and car buff, I look at it in two ways. The first is my amazement and admiration for the crew who sent out distress calls, kept the lights on, and pumps running for as long as they could as the ship sank, which even with all my training I know is not an easy feat. The second way I look at it is from an automotive archeological standpoint. No car-related items have ever been found on the site, but we do have record that cars were on board, namely this 1912 Renault Type CB Coupe de Ville, a car costing $5,000 at the time. That's $115,854.55 in today's money; however, a well-preserved example sold at auction a few years ago for nearly twice that. That Renault was no ordinary car, and it is doubtful that its remains will ever be recovered, as vehicles were kept deep in the forward cargo hold of the great ship. Divers currently cannot explore much of the interior as it is too dangerous, and cries for site preservation have slowed exploration. Even if we could go there, I don't think much of those cars would have survived as they would have been eaten by sea creatures and salt water; however, in an oxygen-starved environment, one might be surprised at what could remain. I can guarantee one thing though. If a car were salvaged from the Titanic, it would be the most valuable flood vehicle on the planet! More info on the cars of the Titanic here and here.  



Avatar
Posted On: 2/23/2012 9:04AM
retroman

There's no doubt about it: Bullitt is an icon, equalled only in stardom by perhaps the General Lee. So it should come as no surprise that McQueen's famed Mustang has made several cameo appearances over the years and even been reincarnated by FoMoCo twice. Everybody wants to be Lt. Frank Bullitt, it seems. What also should be no surprise is the amount of lore, both real and fictitious, surrouding Alcatraz. Stories about "the Rock" have been an on and off staple for Hollywood script writers for decades. Such is the case with Fox's new show, "Alcatraz", and with all the cultural saturation of these two legends, I shouldn't feel excited, except I do because for all my geekiness, Hollywood once again has a familiar Highland Green '68 fastback Mustang stripped of all badging romping around the streets of San Francisco. Sure, I've seen the car in other movies, but none of them had Bullitt take a lead role, a cop at the wheel, or were set in San Francisco. I'm sure the prison historian buffs are getting a kick out of it too and no doubt, the show will be sold on DVD all over San Fran gift shops next year, but for me, it's all about the car. One episode even had Bullitt retracing its steps in a reenactment of the chase. I was waiting for the reverse burnout, but Bullitt actually made the turn this time, so no need for McQueen impersonators. Downside to the chase was the bad guy car was a Crown Vic, not a Charger. Anyway, hit the jump for a pic taken during filming. I feel bad for those who don't know what Bullitt is and will most likely associate Bullitt with the show, and not the classic movie from 1968.

More »


Avatar
Posted On: 2/6/2012 1:26PM
retroman

I guess if I could do subtitles, it would be "She may look like junk, but it's all good under the hood." Over the past year and a half, it's been no surprise that I've dumped a considerable chunk of change into my '87 Fiero GT. Most my friends and family say I'm nuts and stubborn, and I should sell because I've poured upwards of 15 grand into the car in parts and labor. I like to say I'm determined and I've come this far, so why not finish it? I'm not going to do all the work only to have someone else enjoy the benefits. Besides, my motto is and always has been "I don't fix stuff. I upgrade!!" But even now that I have a list of mods a mile long and more on the way, I still get prods for the appearance of my little Pontiac rat rod with its "Plastina" (like patina, but on a plastic body) in all its warped and weathered glory. Seems like the guys on base only care about looks. Sure they made fun of its sketchy reliability, and still do even though those problems are long sorted out. But even when she wasn't running right, all they cared about was when I was going to paint and throw a set of 20s on it. "What's the point of a good looking car if it still doesn't run?" was my response, then added, "Keep your wheels, this car was made to ride low. I won't put anything larger than 18"s on it."

Continue reading after the jump!

More »


Avatar
Posted On: 11/28/2011 8:22AM
retroman

This is the full fastback Reversion Mustang concept as it was featured at SEMA a few weeks back, and as with many SEMA show cars, it is now for sale on ebay. It differs from standard production model, as Ford has only done a '65/'66-inspired partial fastback design on the production '05-'11 Mustang. Reversion simply is a wonderfully thought-out car, and I know that many Mustang fans have been dying to see a full fastback SN195 Mustang: they were slightly dissapointed when Ford didn't follow through on that when the full fastback '03 GT Concept came out. You can check out the listing on eBay, and see video of the car in action below the jump!

More »


Avatar
Posted On: 11/8/2011 10:03AM
retroman

As a car guy, sometimes I don't have the money to do everything I want to do, like drop a six-speed-backed LS9 into my Fiero, so I try to get as close as I can to what I really want. In the case of my Fiero, it's the eventual goal of dropping an LS2 in and building it from there. Occasionally though, I can get the instant gratification of creating a mod that is both cheap and what I want. I am by no means a master, but I do have a few ideas that I have taken pride in. Read on for the story behind my cheapest mod!

More »


Avatar
Posted On: 9/12/2011 9:43AM
retroman

It's a question we all face, but sometimes don't realize until we go to find that special part that we need desparately, like that chrome trim piece for an old Stude, or the one of many necessary mechanical parts it takes to put together a Hudson or a Nash. There are some places in the automotive world that have been left behind or forgotten by the aftermarket. In the early days of motoring, every small town had a car maker near by. Most of these were absorbed by larger companies or fell by the wayside by the middle of the 20th century. Even with the big automakersmakers, you can find gaps in the aftermarket. Just look at all the support enjoyed by the owners of 1964 1/2- 1973 and 1979-current Mustangs while Mustang II enthusiasts are left in the dust. True, the mechanicals of the Mustang II don't depart much from the previous generation, but there is more to restoring than making sure a car purrs well. Issues with body panels, interior, and trim all need to be addressed, and face it, original parts supply is getting shorter with each passing day. That is what the aftermarket is for, to keep making parts that look and function like or better than OEM. But companies chase dollar signs, and that is why some makes and models aren't covered. Continue reading...

More »


Avatar
Posted On: 7/14/2011 11:12AM
retroman

Ok, just to be clear, there are no time traveling DeLoreans out there, at least not that I know of. But for the sake of journalism, let's say you could get into your DeLorean (or in my case, a Fiero) and go back to view the internet's distant past. You could look at anything and view it exactly as it was the day it first appeared on the web, even currently edited or deleted information would be within your grasp. Would you?? I think the CarDomain staff has done an excellent job archiving old blogs and whatnot, but even they are limited on resources, and lets say you were SOTW, but that was like 10 years ago, and your buddies don't believe that you made the CarDomain homepage. Well, this is where the Wayback Machine (handy pun off the WABAC Machine from the Rocky and Bullwinkle show, don't ya think?) proves its worth.

The Wayback is an internet archive dating back to 1996, and records snapshots of the web on a daily basis. It's not exhaustive as some sites receive updates to the archive more often than others, but it is still a very useful tool. It allows you to surf the archived site just as you would on the current version of whatever site you are looking at. Anyway, I've been all over CarDomain's past, and I'm enjoying it just as much as I enjoy surfing the current version. I can tell you that the domain name was first registered around Nov 28, 1999, but if you look at it then you won't see much, just a little note saying the site is under construction. As a matter of fact, the first time any real information appears in the Wayback archive was on Aug 15 of the following year. Boy, was it ever primitive!! The graphics are simple, but functional. Things have changed drastically since then, but computers like cars weren't as powerful as they are now. Some things haven't changed though, and to me it still carries forward the same spirit of automotive connectiveness now as it did then. CarDomain has been and always will be the social networking site for your car.  Check out the Wayback Machine for yourself.